Monday, August 24, 2015

Purchasing a Home? Hire a Professional Real Estate Agent to Help in your Purchase!!

Getting a purchase closed in today's market is complex. The real estate market has changed greatly from only a few years ago. Buyers face many more hurdles including stricter financing, low housing supplies, higher mortgage rates, and rising prices.

To negotiate today's challenges, you need a real estate sales professional to help you close the deal. A good real estate professional understands current market conditions. He or she has house-by-house neighborhood experience and can help you obtain the right home at the best price and terms.

Your agent can help you find a home quickly. Not only do real estate agents have access to the local multiple listing service, they also share knowledge of homes coming onto the market with their colleagues. Your real estate professional will tell others about your requirements for a home so they can also be on the lookout for you.

In fact, networking is one of the biggest industry advantages. Many homes are bought and sold without a sign ever going into the yard. But, for buyers to be shown the latest homes on the market, or to hear about homes about to come onto the market, there has to be a strong relationship between the buyer and the real estate professional.

If you want to be the buyer positioned to make first and best offers on the most desirable homes, make certain your agent knows you are committed. How do you show you're serious? There are several ways.

Get prequalified with a lender. Share your financial records so you know exactly how much home you can buy. Your agent won't go over your limit because it would be a waste of time to show you homes you can't afford to buy.

Work with only one agent. You can do this by signing a buyer's representation agreement, if it's customary in your area. If not, show your loyalty by telling other agents you may meet at open houses or socially that you are represented and give them your agent's name.

Don't shop for homes without your agent. If you want to look at open houses or builder homes, invite your agent to go along. If your agent can't go, make sure you register your agent's name with builder sales reps and open house sellers' agents.

Be loyal. Real estate professionals work primarily on commission. If the deal of the century is about to come on the market, who do you think your agent will tell first - the buyer with five other agents or the buyer who is loyal? If you're playing agents against each other thinking you'll get people to work for free and that you'll have your pick of homes to choose, you're wrong. Agents talk, and they'll find out they're working for the same buyer. If you want great service, show appreciation, confidence, and commitment.

Once you find the house you want, the work really begins. You'll have to navigate negotiations, loan approval, seller's disclosures, inspections with environmental and structural reports, and so on. From helping you make a reasonable offer, to providing for the discovery and disclosure of material facts, your agent can help protect your interests.

Buyers and sellers are natural adversaries. Agents must be skilled negotiators and problem solvers, as well as anticipate problems before they happen. Pride, ignorance, or stubbornness can get in the way of a fair deal for both sides.

Your agent will share your risk, and will make sure you go into any home purchase with your eyes wide open. Take advantage of the greatest homebuying resource available -- your own real estate agent

Thursday, August 13, 2015

Incredible Newer Chino Hills Home!! Offered at $908,000

A SOPHISTICATION OF ARTISTRY, LOCATION AND FUNCTION! Enjoy the privacy & serenity of living at this wide cul-de-sac. Family pleasure commences in the gourmet kitchen having GE Profile appliances, granite counters w/ full backsplash, prep island, raised eating bar, abundant cherry cabinets, butler's & walk-in pantries & French dr to the bkyd. The refreshing escape continues to the gunite pool/spa, freestanding sauna, fire pit & tile-covered patio area. Uncompromising features: natural African Sapele hardwood flr, stairs & baths; berber carpet; stained stair sys; dual Master's walk-in closet; family rm surround sound sys & wide media niche; laundry rm sink; oversized baseboards/door casings; wood window sill & 9-ft ceiling. Energy efficient features: dual-glazed low E windows; dual-zoned HVAC; ceiling fan ready in all bdrms; gas laundry hook-ups & fully insulated ext walls & ceilings. Finishing touches: tech rm blt-in cabinets; bdrm mirrored wardrobe drs & ceiling mounted light fixtures; stained glass pantry dr, light fixtures & window; alarm sys; garage epoxy flr, sink & blt-in cabinets; cat-5 data & gas-stub for future bkyd bbq. The medley of quality materials, superior design & premium location make this 6-bd, 4-ba & 4-car gar home an incredible purchase!

Purchasing a New Home? Here are some tips.

Buying a new home can be a truly exciting experience. Choosing your lot and floorplan, picking out all your fixtures, watching the progress from foundation to framing to finishes. Makes me want to run out and tour a model home right now!

Through all the excitement, though, there are a few realities that may be surprising for those buying new for the first time.

1. You probably won't be able to negotiate the price

New homes are not like resale, where there is the expectation of price negotiations back and forth. The price set by the builder is most likely the price you're going to pay. The exceptions are when there are just a few homes left and when there is standing inventory that needs to be sold.

"Look for builder inventory homes that have been on the market for 45 days or more," said Inman. "These are the homes in which a buyer might be able to get a good deal."

2. But you may be able get some upgrades at no cost

More typical in a new-home community is getting some upgrades thrown in—things like window coverings or nicer flooring. Negotiating a few must-haves into your deal can help offset your costs. Some builders may also help with closing costs as an incentive to buy.

3. There might also be incentives to using the builder's in-house lender

Many builders have an in-house or preferred lender they work with to provide financing for buyers. There may be advantages to using this lender—better terms or a rate that's bought down. By law, the builder can't make you use their lender, so if you feel pressured, be sure to discuss with your real estate agent.

4. Use a REALTOR®

Speaking of Realtors…you can use your agent to buy a new home, and, in fact, you should.

"In general, builders' model homes are staffed by agents who work directly for and represent the builder. A buyer also needs to have a real estate agent who represents them and looks after their best interests," said Inman. "Keep in mind that most builders will require that the real estate agent accompany and register the buyer on their first visit to the builder's model home or community."

5. Your home will not look like the model

When you tour a model home, it's decked out with pretty walls and floors and lighting and countertops. The furniture is to scale and the fabrics are custom and the pictures are hung perfectly. It's pretty seductive. But the empty shell you buy won't look like this if you go with all the standard configurations and finishes. Be realistic about what you want, what you need, what you can afford, and how that translates to what you are seeing. The salesperson can point out which of the items you love in the model come standard and which are pricey upgrades.

6. The price of the home as advertised is not what you'll pay

Typically, it will take many tens of thousands of dollars in upgrades and options to get the home you buy to look like the model. This can be a rude awakening for buyers who are trying to stick to a strict budget. The good news is rolling some of those upgrades into the mortgage can make good financial sense, according to Money Crashers.

"Upgrading during the initial construction phase is generally cheaper than updating your home later on. For example, if you choose to upgrade from laminate flooring to hardwood, you'll pay the difference in material costs—but you won't necessarily have to pay extra for the installation itself, since your builder needs to install floors in the first place. The same goes for things like windows and bathroom features."

7. You'll be dealing with construction noise and traffic. For a while.

The peaceful life you envision can be a reality, but probably not from the get-go. Depending on the community, it may take time to complete construction. Which means dealing with congestion and hassle for the time being. Amenities like pools, sport courts, and trails may also not be built out by the time you move in. Asking ahead of time about the construction schedule can help you manage expectations.

8. Not everything will work perfectly

In any house, there are bound to be issues. New homes are no different. Builder warranties will help.

"Warranties for newly built homes generally offer limited coverage on workmanship and materials relating to various components of the home, such as windows, heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), plumbing, and electrical systems for specific periods. Warranties also typically define how repairs will be made," said the FCC. "The duration of coverage varies depending on the component of the house. Most warranties on new construction cover siding and stucco, doors and trim, and drywall and paint during the first year. Coverage for HVAC, plumbing, and electrical systems is generally two years. Some builders provide coverage for up to 10 years for "major structural defects."